It shows your true ignorance by calling someone an idiot. In no way was this thread used to alienate anyone, but merely having a heated discussion of professions and their importance. If you didn’t read my comment correctly, I said…”for example.” I know the difference between graphic design and being a surgeon. Those of you who are obviously majorly left-brained will never understand the creative industry. You’re right, anyone can be a bad designer, or a bad surgeon, or a bad accountant coordinator…etc. That’s why there exists terrible brand identities, malpractice suits, etc as well. All I was saying that the creative industry shouldn’t be held below the threshold of what is real and what is a fake profession. All professions should be respected in their own right. Period.

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 @dasjung No doubt! I know this and you know this, and any other highly skilled and educated designer will also know this. But what about the customers? The people who are looking for a logo design with much consideration of price in this economy.  Knowledge and talent expect the monetary reimbursement it deserves, but unless everybody has a trained eye to recognize it, they just aren’t going to dish out the money for it. That is the point I am trying to make. It is like calling the neighborhood handyman instead of  a high cost plumber to fix a small leak.

You can do a lot of things, like selling old study or work books on eBay. You could look into having a yard sale and sell old toys, shoes, and clothes. You could have a bake sale or lemonade stand, but to make it stand out, add a twist like blackberry mint lemonade or lemon curd sunshine. If you are creative with it, you can attract more customers.
19. eBay – Of course you can’t read an article about making money online that doesn’t mention eBay. You can start an eBay store and get serious about it or you can just sell some stuff to declutter your home. Either way, I’ve made my fair share from selling on eBay and it’s still a popular way to earn money. If you decide to start an actual eBay store, you’ll want to find a drop-ship business like Doba that will store and ship items straight to your customers so you don’t have to deal with an inventory.
If you don’t mind doing other people’s chores, then TaskRabbit is a great option for making money online. Earn extra income by walking your neighbor’s dog or mowing Mr. Smith’s lawn. It might seem like not the most lucrative option, but the top taskers reportedly earn as much as $7000 a month, making this a full-time way to make money online for some.
If you hook up with a for-hire car parking service (the type hired out for fancy neighborhood parties) you can make some nice cash tips in just a few hours at night and on the weekend, when parties are held. The key here is to do a great job by showing hustle and being super friendly. This was one of the most enjoyable jobs I had during graduate school. Who doesn’t like to drive nice cars?

Have an extra room in the house? Try renting it out on Airbnb.com. According to Smart Asset, you can pay up to 81% of your rent by listing one room in a two-bedroom home. If you're really looking to ring in the cash, renting out a private home or apartment is the way to go. According to Smart Asset's findings, rates for full apartments are significantly higher than those for just rooms, with annual profits ranging from $15,000 to $31,000 for a two-bedroom apartment.
Market your course: The beauty of using a course to make money online is that you can continue to sell it for as long as you’d like. Look for niche communities on Facebook, LinkedIn, or Reddit that might benefit from your content. Guest blogging on relevant sites. Look for anywhere you might be able to get in front of the right people. With just a few hours a month you can continue to generate sales.
The stuff you can’t sell online, you could sell from your garage on the weekends. Many neighborhoods plan annual or bi-annual yard sales. If you have items to sell, this is a great time to do it as the neighborhood as a whole can bring in a lot of traffic and help you perform better than you would on your own. If that’s not possible, consider partnering up with a couple of families in a popular neighborhood.
A large subset of our society is earning a full-time income by selling items on Craigslist and eBay. You can do this by selling your own items, or you can help sell items for other people and take a small commission. Selling on eBay offers more friction than Craigslist and you'll need to establish solid reviews before you can begin to move high-ticket items.
Hi, came across this information after trying to brain storm of fun way to make extra $$. I’m a RN and work 3 days a week and have 4 days off! (Best part of the job ?) I am thinking of trying to purchase Authenticate designer handbags and creating a page to resale. My delima is how to find a reputable supplier. Do you have any ideas?? I’ve even gone to Designer handbag selling sites and asked…all I get are members wanting to sell me “their” purchases at a small discounted price.
Perhaps you’re raising kids and you’re committed to not using daycare. Maybe you’re a little older and can’t commit to a full-time job. Or you might be injured or disabled, making it difficult for you to leave your home each day. Whatever your reason is, if you’re stuck at home most of the day, you’ve probably thought about the income you could be making by taking a work-from-home job or running your own business.
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