Wow that’s a lot of very different kinds of topics you plan on covering, Rolland! My advice would be to pare it down to just 2-3 closely related topics that you can start to build an audience around… and from there, focus on just a small handful of activities that’ll help you attract some viewers/readers (rather than spending time on a lot of different tactics).
Another great way to earn money from your home office is to sell your skills or knowledge by teaching classes through Udemy or Coursera. For instance, if you’re an exercise guru, you might start an exercise class in a large spacious area in your home. People are willing to pay to learn about many fields of knowledge, from cooking and gardening to soap or candle making. Playing a musical instrument, child birthing, dancing, dog training, yoga, and even foreign languages are all great topics for expert classes.
Choose your niche and check for demand: The golden course combination is when you can find an in-demand niche that aligns with your skills and unique experiences. A great way to do this is to use Google Trends, Google’s Keyword Planner and other key blogging tools to do keyword research and look for average monthly search volume for keywords related to your proposed course content. Are people actively looking for high-quality information about this subject? Of course, if you’re already creating content for a blog, coaching service, or a site like Medium, you can test demand this way for free just like Bryan did.
Sell stock photos. Stock photos are simple, somewhat nondescript images that people can use for a fee in articles, brochures, presentations, etc. They don’t earn much apiece, but if you upload a nice little collection, the sales can really add up – especially since photos can be sold over and over. Best of all, it doesn’t get much easier than clicking off a few decent shots, uploading them, and waiting.
I’m really torn here. As a writer, I sympathize with you. I’ve looked again and again into freelancing, and consistently find that the rates other people are willing to work for make it an insulting waste of my time. (Like, $10/hour is what a 15-year-old babysitter makes, not a professional writer.) On the other hand, you really can’t ask others to not compete with you. On the plus side, in my (limited) experience, you do get what you pay for most of the time. My sister had a less-expensive wedding photographer, and she was definitely less than happy with the results. So …
While I think that your initial response to Phillip’s suggestion about design was a little too strong, Dasjung, I’ve got to chime in here and observe that Phil, ThunderCock and Dumbass, by resorting to name calling and simplistic reasoning, come across as very lacking in both decorum and sensitivity.  If a guy wants to expect, even demand, high quality in his field of choice, I beleive he has a right, if not a responsibility, to do so!  Also, Dumbass, be careful who you call Dumbass. You just show YOUR true colors by doing so. 
One of the best places to sell unwanted personal possessions is Decluttr, a website that buys used items directly from consumers. Unlike trade-in marketplaces such as Gazelle and auction websites such as eBay, Decluttr doesn’t act as a middleman between buyers and sellers. Rather, it’s best understood as a bulk buyer: an enterprise with deep pockets and an unsatiable appetite for used consumer products.
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