In 2014, Caitlin Pyle made over $43,000 by working as a freelance proofreader…in her spare time. When she wasn’t working, she even had time to go on several fun vacations. After she had a ton of success doing that, she decided she wanted to teach others how to do the same thing, so she started up Proofread Anywhere. Sign up for one of her free workshops to learn more about making money as a proofreader.

The first follows the startup path we outlined above: You have a disruptive idea for an app or piece of software, you validate the idea with real customers, and then raise money to hire developers or a development studio to build, launch, and scale your software. If you’ve done everything right, your software will be accepted to the Apple and Google Stores and you’ll make money every time someone downloads it or pays for a premium feature.


One of the best things about working online is that you get to choose your own work schedule. You can work at night, during the day or even weekends. It is really up to you. This means that you will get to spend more time with your family, go for vacations, plan holiday activities, tour the world and much more. In addition, you get to live anywhere around the globe without the worry of job transfers.


If you have a propensity for writing and you can slay with your prose, consider writing an ebook. While the market has certainly become saturated as of late, books that help teach people about a technical topic still sell extremely well. This is a great source of passive income but does require a large amount of effort at the outset before any money is generated.

During my high school days, I was a pretty decent golfer (about a 2-3 handicap, for you other golfers out there). I was asked by my local club professional if I would help him teach his junior golf clinics that summer. If you have specialized skill in any sport, there are definitely opportunities out there for teaching others the fundamentals (and getting paid).


Now that you know how to make extra money, try a few of these (or all 30) and see if you can generate a nice little chunk of change. You can use these ideas no matter what Baby Step you’re on! Take that extra cash you bring in and toss it at your money goals—things like paying off debt, saving up for your emergency fund, or putting a little extra toward retirement. With extra dollars in your pocket you’ll be kicking major butt on your goals in no time!
Sell stock photos. Stock photos are simple, somewhat nondescript images that people can use for a fee in articles, brochures, presentations, etc. They don’t earn much apiece, but if you upload a nice little collection, the sales can really add up – especially since photos can be sold over and over. Best of all, it doesn’t get much easier than clicking off a few decent shots, uploading them, and waiting.
Next, you need to set up and build your YouTube channel. Your YouTube channel is your home base for all your content. If you already have a Google account for Gmail or Google Drive, then you can use that to log-in to YouTube and start setting up your channel. Pick a username that works for you and is memorable (if you’re using an existing Google account you’ll have to edit your username in Google+).
Sites like Cookening, EatWith, and MealSharing are to restaurants what Airbnb is to hotels. Sign up as a host to earn dough by cooking and serving meals to guests in your home. It's up to you what you want to cook and how many people you can accommodate. Cooks are paid directly through the site, so no cash ever changes hands. The earning potential for becoming a cooking host is $50-$100 per meal.
When it comes to at-home income, selling your unwanted stuff is the definition of “low-hanging fruit.” Even if you’re resolutely intentional in your purchasing habits, you surely have possessions that you can do without: old kids’ clothing and toys, disused sporting goods, out-of-fashion wardrobe accessories, electronics, entertainment, valuable but non-sentimental keepsakes such as watches and jewelry, broken-in furniture, dusty tools and outdoor equipment, and perhaps even big-ticket items like a motorcycle or second car.
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