In my (unpopular) opinion, getting a raise is harder than getting a promotion. Think about it from your boss’s perspective, would you rather a) pay more money for the same service, or b) pay more money for additional responsibilities. Alas, if you feel you’re overdue a raise, check out Dr. Randall Hansen’s article on Getting the Raise You Deserve. There are some really useful strategies there.
Truebill: Once you’re done creating a free account and connecting your bank and credit card accounts, Truebill goes to work and analyzes your finances. It will find subscriptions you may want to cancel, negotiates bills on your behalf, tracks and categorizes your spending, and automates saving to help reach your goals. The app is free to download and use, but premium features come with a price. Similar to BillShark, Truebill’s negotiation commission is 40% of savings.

The key is to make the class sound unique and irresistible. Don’t just teach a cooking class; come up with specialty cooking classes. You might teach a class on how to make artesian breads, or cinnamon rolls that rival Cinnabon. The possibilities are endless, and if you consistently offer educational and fun classes, you’ll have people signing up over and over again.
My local Craigslist.org is the first place I go to sell something. It’s best for items you think will appeal to everyone (therefore justifying the smaller audience) and large items that can’t be shipped. Craigslist.org is great for taking your yard sale items online for local sales. For example, a friend recently bought two fans from people that live close to him. These one-off type items do very well on Craigslist. Just remember to use common sense and be safe out there.

Overall good ideas, but we need to define the idea of ‘fast 100 bucks. Swagbucks is pretty slow as an income resource and it would take a while, not to mention selling stock photos is not something you do in 2 days. I tried this 4 years ago with my close to pro’ photos and it took days to set up a small portfolio there with some outstanding work and yet made no sells.

Who knew you could be paid to listen to music? Slicethepie is the largest paid review site on the internet that pays you to listen to music and write detailed reviews. How much you'll earn per review varies by the quality of your review. A.k.a. the more detailed and constructive, the better. The minimum payment is $10, so once you've reviewed enough songs to earn at least $10, your money will be sent to you via a direct payments on PayPal.


If you’re serious about making money selling things online, it’s pretty much impossible to not recommend Shopify. The platform gives you everything you need to get your online store up and running in less than a day including a custom domain, beautiful templates (so you don’t need design skills), secure payment options, and they can even take care of marketing and shipping for you. Whether you’re promoting your own products, designs, or curating other products for people in your niche, Shopify is the best option for powering your online store.
If you are great at typing fast and transcribing, this is for you! By signing up at Transcribe Me, you get to work on tasks where you are expected to turn audios and videos into text form. All that you need is a computer connected to the internet and your transcription skills. Tracking of your weekly work is easy and in real-time. You can request payment at any time as long as you have a minimum balance of $20. Payments are fast and secure way through PayPal every Thursday before 9 a.m. EST.

If you love to travel and find yourself randomly searching for airfare sales or browsing Lonely Planet, why not carve out a niche for yourself as a private travel agent? My friend, Mark Jackson did just that, making extra money online with his travel consulting side business. Start with word of mouth recommendations from friends who know they can count on you for the cheapest flights, and then move on and create a Facebook or LinkedIn group to invite people who want to stay on top of the latest deals. Eventually you could spin this into a full-time consultancy teaching people how to make their dream trip a reality.
Clothing:  thredUp makes it easy to sell clothes online. To sell your items, order a free “Clean Out Bag” on thredUP’s website. Then send in your shoes via FedEx or USPS. Once they arrive, thredUp will inspect your items before listing. Their site says they accept less than 40% of items in the average Clean Out Bag. Make sure your items are clean, name-brand, less than five years old, and in excellent condition to increase your chances. Depending on the popularity of the clothing items you send in, you will be paid either after processing, or once your items sell.
BigCommerce is a turn-key solution for online entrepreneurs that gives you a number of built-in features, including several marketing options that allow you to find (and woo) your target customers. Also, their product comes with integrated education to help you make the most of your online store. And you’ll get excellent loading speed, payment security, and site functionality.
Jeff have you ever considered adding something on price comparison sites for selling your used stuff? One of the fastest 100 bucks I have made so far was just from old textbooks and dvds on price comparison sites that give you the best offers. I know Bonavendi.com is a good but im sure there are others. Anyway would be interesting to see your take on the matter, the other ideas I found really creative though. Thanks for the read brother
Another great way to earn money from your home office is to sell your skills or knowledge by teaching classes through Udemy or Coursera. For instance, if you’re an exercise guru, you might start an exercise class in a large spacious area in your home. People are willing to pay to learn about many fields of knowledge, from cooking and gardening to soap or candle making. Playing a musical instrument, child birthing, dancing, dog training, yoga, and even foreign languages are all great topics for expert classes.
But don't make the mistake of thinking this will be a passive source of income—you're on call whenever you have a guest and you'll always need to keep the place clean for incoming visitors. On top of just renting on Airbnb, consider offering your guests paid add-ons, like Lauren Gheysens', Royal Day Out in London, England—where she gives visitors a local's only tour of the city, complete with bespoke 18th century costumes.
Who knew you could be paid to listen to music? Slicethepie is the largest paid review site on the internet that pays you to listen to music and write detailed reviews. How much you'll earn per review varies by the quality of your review. A.k.a. the more detailed and constructive, the better. The minimum payment is $10, so once you've reviewed enough songs to earn at least $10, your money will be sent to you via a direct payments on PayPal.
Disclosure: Please note that some of the links below are affiliate links and at no additional cost to you, I may earn a commission. When you purchase a product using my one of my affiliate links, the company compensates me, which helps me run this blog and keep things like my 25,000 word ultimate guide to starting a blog free of charge to you. Know that I also only recommend products I personally stand behind.
Get creative and sell yourself! (it’s not what you think) There’s a company called Fiverr that connects people who can do things for other people. We all have talents and some of them can be quite marketable. For example, you could offer to design logos, create online content, put together scrapbooks, paint a pretty picture or even lending your voice to a podcast! Gigs start at $5 but a person can make much, much more. Listen to my podcast episode with a successful Fiverr creator. And sign up with Fiverr today.
Check with your local bank to see if they're giving away cash bonuses for opening up accounts. Banks run promotions like this all the time, so grab some real cash quickly if you're in need. It won't break the bank (no pun intended) but it will give you a quick $50 or $100 -- maybe even more -- when you really need it. You might need to deposit a minimum amount of cash (usually in the thousands) in order to qualify for these types of accounts (but not always).
Now, it’s time to plan out your show. If you’re doing an interview-style show, you’ll now want to start getting some guests involved. You can use your existing social network to reach out to people you already know or are connected with on Twitter or Facebook. You can also head to Medium or Amazon to find authors or experts on topics specific to your niche.
You might be desperate for work, but don’t necessarily jump at an opportunity that sounds too good to be true. In my article about common Craigslist scams, I wrote about fake employers who “hire” new employees, then “accidentally” send them too much pay. They’ll ask their victims to wire back the difference, but a few weeks later, when the bank discovers that the initial check is a fraud, the “employee” is on the hook for hundreds, sometimes even thousands of dollars. If a job offer sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

Zilok is free for individual members to create listings, but rental businesses have to pay fees. To list your item on Zilok, you’ll have to create a post with a description, photos and a price per day. Once a renter finds your product, Zilok takes a commission depending on the listing price. For everything under $10, the commission fee is $1. Fees range between 5% and 9% for all other price categories.
More and more companies and startups especially are embracing remote work—where you use online collaboration and communication tools to do your work from wherever you want. And you don’t have to be a 20-something hotshot designer or coder to reap the benefits of working remotely. Many remote positions are for customer support positions or other customer-facing positions that don’t require specialized skill sets.
Having your own site to sell gently used handbags is probably going to be a really, really difficult endeavor for what its worth. It will be hard to get enough eyeballs/visitors on those bags to generate enough sales to make you any meaningful income (it’s an incredibly small niche and almost too specific in nature). Not to deter you from the idea completely but you’ll need to commit to several years of patience to really hit a home run in that field.
If you upload photos of yourself, or friends/family with consent, it's worth going for the 'rights managed' licence option – otherwise you'll have little to no control over how your images are used (eg, you could star in an ad for haemorrhoid cream). See Alamy's page on understanding stock image licensing for more on the different types of licences.
I’ve tried a fair few things on this list and I’m a big fan of those side hustles that have the potential for ongoing passive income once you’re set up. For me, the most successful have been blogging and T shirt designs (I use Merch by Amazon but want to look into Teespring as you suggest). I’m currently working on an Etsy printable business, again for the passive income potential!
Now, it’s time to plan out your show. If you’re doing an interview-style show, you’ll now want to start getting some guests involved. You can use your existing social network to reach out to people you already know or are connected with on Twitter or Facebook. You can also head to Medium or Amazon to find authors or experts on topics specific to your niche.
This depends on what you want to sell. If you want to sell clothing items or other things with your own designs on them, you could start with a print on demand site like Zazzle or Redbubble where you provide the design and the vendor prints the product to fulfill orders. You will get only a percentage of the profit, but you do not need to pay anything up front or to keep your digital store open on these sites. If you are making a physical product and are looking for free or cheap raw materials, try garage sales or Craigslist. For example, you may be able to get free lumber that someone is looking to get rid of.
It shows your true ignorance by calling someone an idiot. In no way was this thread used to alienate anyone, but merely having a heated discussion of professions and their importance. If you didn’t read my comment correctly, I said…”for example.” I know the difference between graphic design and being a surgeon. Those of you who are obviously majorly left-brained will never understand the creative industry. You’re right, anyone can be a bad designer, or a bad surgeon, or a bad accountant coordinator…etc. That’s why there exists terrible brand identities, malpractice suits, etc as well. All I was saying that the creative industry shouldn’t be held below the threshold of what is real and what is a fake profession. All professions should be respected in their own right. Period.
In our local neighborhood, we’ve seen this service hired out to place signs in people’s yards for announcements or funny pranks. Ha! If you’re out and about on a Sunday you’ll see plenty of people putting put signs for open houses. You’ll probably have a great opportunity for this extra money idea if you can locate a neighborhood where lots of real estate agents or putting out there own signs.
More and more companies and startups especially are embracing remote work—where you use online collaboration and communication tools to do your work from wherever you want. And you don’t have to be a 20-something hotshot designer or coder to reap the benefits of working remotely. Many remote positions are for customer support positions or other customer-facing positions that don’t require specialized skill sets.
The second (and cheaper) path assumes that you have the design and dev chops yourself to build your dream software. Naturally, it’ll take more time to get your product off the ground, but being able to bootstrap the development of your software lets you retain more ownership in your business and be more in control of your path, making this a lower-cost, but higher time investment to make money selling apps.
I have tried to sign up & complete cash for surveys in the past and then felt like I was being led down a rabitt’s hole, going from one “skip” and/or “submit” to another without ever, seemingly, actually completing the entire process.  So, when I saw CashCrate recommended in ptmoney.com, I thought it was going to be more straight forward, but, alas, no, I entered the rabitt’s hole once again, coming up for air only after an entire hour spent hopping, skipping, and jumpring all over the place, netting 25 cents in earnings!  Has this been anyone else’s experience and what has been done to remedy the situation?  It seems like there must exist an insider’s trick or, at least, know-how that I am missing. 

Who knew you could be paid to listen to music? Slicethepie is the largest paid review site on the internet that pays you to listen to music and write detailed reviews. How much you'll earn per review varies by the quality of your review. A.k.a. the more detailed and constructive, the better. The minimum payment is $10, so once you've reviewed enough songs to earn at least $10, your money will be sent to you via a direct payments on PayPal.
Writing an eBook, like you said, is not easy. First you have to have something to write about, which often means that you need to be some kind of respected expert in the field you wish to write about.However, if you can get past the initial trouble of selecting a topic, becoming an expert, and finally writing about that topic, that’s when the hard part really starts….
Hi Ryan, your blog and advice is so helpful, thank you. I am planning to start a blog and podcast around personal development, that I have found a niche in, that can hopefully help many people. Should I start with the blog or podcast, as both will be a learning curve for me as a beginner. Also, may I please ask you if there is a chance for a brain storming chat with you via email or is that not something you offer. I would so appreciate being able to run my idea past an expert. Thank you

I really like the idea of writing poorly written ads. It seem like it can be easy and you can make a small profit. I know that use to work at a school and we got our extra money from writing grants. People can write grants to start a business so I am in the process of trying to write my own grant to start a community program for teens. its a litte extra money and I still get to do what I love. If you have any kind of hobby you can prob. turn that into some income if you can get creative. Good luck

For sure! I think that’s something Jeff and I have learned rather quickly is to definitely not put all your eggs in one basket. We had 1-2 affiliates that we promoted for the longest time that were by and large our main sources of income. We realized that if we lost even 1 of those affiliates we would be in for a huge world of hurt when it came to our monthly intake.
Utilize websites like Payscale.com, Salary.com, and free salary guides from Robert Half and Randstad to find out what a competitive salary might be for someone with your expertise and education in your area. Document everything that you have accomplished at work in the past year and present it to your employer. When you are making an honest case for yourself instead of demanding a raise, your employer will at least consider your request.
Work Space. When acting as a consultant, the probability is high that clients will be visiting your home office. Therefore, you need to have a neat, professional home office that is welcoming to guests. Try to locate your work space in a quiet, even secluded, area of the house. A converted garage space with its own entrance works well, giving you a private space for work and adding to your credibility.
Job Boards. When you’re first starting out, you’ll have to go looking for work, and the best place to do that is on one of the online job boards. Places like  Fiverr, Elance, Freelancer, and oDesk are today’s writers’ best friends. They allow individuals and businesses to post projects, and freelancers to bid on them. Take a look around the sites, sign up for the free access in the beginning, and then begin to place bids on the projects that interest you. It will take some trial and error to find your groove, but once you do, the jobs will start to roll in.
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